Available Online CLE Courses

Category:
1:22:28
The Hiring and Firing of Employees: Best Practices for the Solo/Small Firm Practitioner
Legal Aspects of the Hiring Process Presented by Mark T. Wassell, Esquire - Knox McLaughlin Gornall & Sennett, P.C. The legal do's and don'ts of the hiring process will be examined. The focus w... Read More »
Legal Aspects of the Hiring Process
Presented by Mark T. Wassell, Esquire - Knox McLaughlin Gornall & Sennett, P.C.

The legal do's and don'ts of the hiring process will be examined. The focus will be on the use of employment applications, interviews, and background checks to determine the best candidate for the job. Permissible questions to ask the applicant and the proper means to learn of his/her work history will be reviewed.

Employee Accountability:  Disciplining and Discharging Employees
Presented by Daniel M. Miller, Esquire - MacDonald Illig Jones & Britton LLP

Gain a better understanding of the at-will employment doctrine, its status and the many exceptions to it.  Additional discussion will include corrective action with fairness, consistency and compliance with federal, state and local laws.

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Categories: Business & Commercial Law
1:10:11
The Slants - Taking Their Trademark & First Amendment Rights Case to the U.S. Supreme Court
Background: The Slants are an Asian-American rock band. The group's frontman, Simon Tam, filed a lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office prevented the band from registering its name and ... Read More »
Background: The Slants are an Asian-American rock band. The group's frontman, Simon Tam, filed a lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office prevented the band from registering its name and rejected an appeal based on the Lanham Act. This Act prohibits any trademark that could "disparage… or bring… into contemp(t) or disrepute" any "persons, living or dead."

After a Federal Court agreed with Tam and his band, the Patent and Trademark Office appealed to the United States Supreme Court to avoid being compelled to register The Slants name as a trademark. In June of this year, the Supreme Court sided with The Slants.

Attorney Jonathan D'Silva adds "What is interesting about this case is the activism, art, and First Amendment issues surrounding it. The Slants didn't have to fight the issue; they are NOT required to register their trademark to have a trademark. The question for them was why does the government have any right to state that a particular viewpoint crosses an arbitrary and subjective threshold of propriety that makes them unable to grant a status when they have already done so in other contexts?"

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Categories: Business & Commercial Law